Lopez Lomong (II) oder: was das IOC nicht hören will

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Lopez Lomong, im Juli 2008 bei den US-Trials in Eugene, Oregon

Die London Times hat sich nun auch der Geschichte des Lopez Lomong, den Lost Boys of Sudan, Darfur und all den politischen Implikationen bei den Sommerspielen in Peking angenommen:

Genau das ist es. Diesen Aspekt habe ich in meiner Geschichte noch etwas unterbelichtet, ich wollte die Aufmerksamkeit auf das Schicksal der sudanesischen Kinder lenken, wie es auch Lopez Lomong wichtig ist, und nicht schon wieder auf die Verlogenheit des IOC und die Verbrechen der chinesischen Regierung. Owen Slot schreibt in der Times:

So when Lomong gets to Beijing there will be two subjects about which he feels extremely strongly. One is that he can put his heart and soul and every straining sinew into representing the country of his choice, the United States, and the other is that he may be able to talk freely about Sudan and how the Government that backed the militia that ripped him from his family is doing the same in the Darfur region today and that that Government buys its arms from China in exchange for oil. (…)

One way for Lomong to express his view has been to join Team Darfur, a group of nearly 400 international sportsmen and women who are using the Beijing Games as a platform from which to urge China to act to help the Sudan crisis.

Around the Olympics venues in Beijing, however, Lomong will not be allowed to wear a Team Darfur T-shirt or wristband because the guidelines of the IOC on political propaganda forbid it. Even when in his room in the Olympic village he will be discouraged from displaying Team Darfur material. In following these guidelines, Lomong is being forced, during the Games, to suspend the truth of his past.

Pflichtlektüre.

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